Articles

The word "DECOY"

Duck Decoy’s are a functional tool primary that were used with as many as 300 similar blocks to lure in wild birds to excited waiting hunters.


  1.  a bird or mammal, or an imitation of one, used by hunters to lure game. 
  2.  a thing used to mislead or lure someone into a trap. 
  3.  a pond from which narrow netted channels lead, into which wild duck may be enticed for capture. verb lure by means of a decoy.

Duck Decoy’s are a functional tool primary that were used with as many as 300 similar blocks to lure in wild birds to excited waiting hunters.

To day, many decoys are still used for hunting but many thousands have been retired and are being used in Antique shops to lure in wild decoy collectors, excited about finding the next treasure.

Like the early hunters that had different opinions about what was the best decoy and how they should be used .

Today’s collectors have similar opinions on what decoys are treasures or trash.

In the most early days of decoys they were primitively constructed from materials on hand, marsh grass, tamarack, mud, twigs even animal skins. All usually had a few found feathers of wild birds to add color and texture.

From the mid 1800's to 1918 was the glory years of decoys. Thousands of decoys were carved out. The market hunter were in full flight and the demand for wooden decoys were higher than what could be supplied. There were many individual carvers that sold decoys but soon factories took the overflow. The Mason, Dodge, Stevens, Victor, and Peterbourgh Decoy Companies were some of the many ones.

The diehard men hunting day after day, many even in spring and fall. It’s a known fact that many of these outdoors men prided themselves on hitting 3 or more ducks per shot on a regular basis. Then unfortunately for the waterfowl there was the invention of the punt gun. It was like a small canon that was bolted to the duck boat and could shoot dozens per shot.

In these days, ducks were an important source of food for early families.
Many for the commercial hunters also sold at market. The folks would go into town and sell the day’s hunt often by the pair. The ducks were also shipped in barrels by rail to larger centers. In early days it was common in all the upscale restaurants to order a wild duck dinner or in some areas geese, swans, even shorebirds.

Contact Steven

National Decoy Information Centre
www.decoyinfo.com

Steven Lloyd, Canada’s Foremost Authority on Historical Decoys, has established a National Decoy Information Centre, www.decoyinfo.com. The Centre seeks to inform and educate people about the history and value of wooden decoys.

For more information contact the Centre:

 

“The National Decoy Information Centre”

Steven Lloyd
242 Sherry Road
Thomasburg Ontario Canada K0K 3H0

decoyinformation@aol.com
Phone 1-613-922-7000